Poet Remi Graves on Music, Protest & Utopian Dreams

Poet Remi Graves on Music, Protest & Utopian Dreams

Remi Graves is a poet, musician & educator who completed a 6-week digital residency with us, exploring the Magna Carta via everything from utopian visions to her grandmother’s hands. Below you can find all her musings and poetry from over the course of the 6 weeks.   More about Remi “I’m an ex-maths teacher, turned … Continue reading Poet Remi Graves on Music, Protest & Utopian Dreams

7 June 2017  //  Remi Graves


Remi Graves is a poet, musician & educator who completed a 6-week digital residency with us, exploring the Magna Carta via everything from utopian visions to her grandmother’s hands. Below you can find all her musings and poetry from over the course of the 6 weeks.

  • Week 1 | Music & Protest
    22 May 2017
    22 May 2017
  • Week 2 | Form
    29 May 2017
    29 May 2017
  • Week 3 | Word & Image
    5 June 2017
    5 June 2017
  • Week 4 | Which way to Utopia?
    12 June 2017
    12 June 2017
  • Week 5 | Borders & Bodies
    19 June 2017
    19 June 2017
  • Week 6 | Digital Dwellers
    26 June 2017
    26 June 2017

 

More about Remi

“I’m an ex-maths teacher, turned poet and drummer based in London. I’ve just finished a residency with Spine Festival at Croydon Library working to engage youth; I also deliver workshops in schools. I’m a member of 2016-17 Barbican Young Poets, and my work can be found in publications such as Skin Deep, Ver Poets Anthology and NON Quarterly. My current projects include a poetry and music duo with South African poet and performer Toni Stuart. 

I’m really excited to take on this digital poet-in residence role and am looking forward to spending the next month, unpacking, unpicking and re-framing the ways tenets of Magna Carta play out in our daily life. This role feels particularly poignant in a time where civil liberties, digital rights and the question of citizenship weigh heavy on the world. I hope that through the residency I’m able to spark a dialogue around who we value as citizens, what freedoms and rights we take for granted, and in particular how the UK’s use of detention centres clash with some of Magna Carta’s founding principles. 

By playing with the language, structure and meaning of Magna Carta I hope to turn this ancient document into a fertile ground for critical discussions, art and play.  Given the current threat to our human rights act, now more than ever seems a time to pick up our pens, as a call to arms.”

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