DisObey: an interview with Jordan Baseman

DisObey: an interview with Jordan Baseman

Jordan Baseman’s new film, DisObey, is a portrait of ideas about the law, society and what governs our behaviour socially. Jordan is a visual artist and filmmaker. His work is research led and he uses recorded interviews, observations and archival material to create narrative-based, creative nonfiction in the form of single-screen films, sound works or … Continue reading DisObey: an interview with Jordan Baseman

22 October 2017  // 


Jordan Baseman’s new film, DisObey, is a portrait of ideas about the law, society and what governs our behaviour socially.

Jordan is a visual artist and filmmaker. His work is research led and he uses recorded interviews, observations and archival material to create narrative-based, creative nonfiction in the form of single-screen films, sound works or moving image installations. DisObey is a work made during a residency with the University of Lincoln between 2015 – 2017.

How did you write the script for the film?

In the film the narrator is a guy called Jason Warr who’s a leading criminologist in this country and he talks about social order, prisons and the law and his own experience of the law and prison, and a lack of social order. I interviewed Jason a couple of times and it’s a heavily edited version of those interviews, so I’ve rearranged what he said. I kept the tone and the spirit and obviously he gave the film his blessing but it isn’t what he said, it’s a reordering of what he said in order to really focus on some of the ideas that are contained within his narration. He pretty much calls for a reordering of society in order for us to change and become better human beings, to really fulfil our potential.

Where are the visuals from?

The film is visually driven by archive material that is from the Media Archive for Central England and some original material.

What’s the relation with Magna Carta?

The Magna Carta is a big deal in my country, I think it’s a bigger deal in America than it is here. I took the Magna Carta as a very loose starting point as a document that laid the foundation for an idea of the law and our social responsibility in regards to the law. The film doesn’t refer to Magna Carta at all but it refers to protest and revolt and our individual and collective social responsibility.

Where did your residency take place?

At the School of Law and the School of Sciences of the University of Lincoln (UK). I spent the first three or four months working in the archive at the Media Archive of Central England and the rest of that year was spent interviewing people connected to the schools.

Where can I see your work?

Some of my work is on my website at https://www.jordanbaseman.co.uk/

 

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