School Of Gentle Protest // Week 2: Inner Protest

    Before we ask other people to change their actions, behaviour or views we need to start by seeing if we need to change our ways too. That can be uncomfortable, which is why handicrafts can be a great, comforting tool to help us reflect deeply and critically whilst also crafting something that fits … Continue reading School Of Gentle Protest // Week 2: Inner Protest

Inner Activism: The Importance of Being an Everyday Activist

Rallying for something you are passionate about, raising your voice and your banners against injustice and hypocrisy, maybe even chaining yourself to trees and buildings… These methods are what most people associate with activism; creating a physical representation of your position on an issue, hoping that either the people we want to influence or the … Continue reading Inner Activism: The Importance of Being an Everyday Activist

Why We Need To Protest Gently

In an age of slacktivism & clicktivism, we need gentle protest more than ever The list of issues that need to be addressed in the world today is seemingly impossible. From large corporations exploiting workers to swell their profit margins or politicians instigating divisive and destructive policies, to the small, everyday acts of discrimination carried out … Continue reading Why We Need To Protest Gently

In the Face of Trumpaggeddon, We’ve Recruited A Cartoonist

The past few tumultuous months elude simple description. Phrases such as ‘post-truth’, ‘alternative facts’ and ‘oh God, what’s he done now’ are now part and parcel of the news. The more melodramatic amongst us can be heard uttering notions of ‘Trumpaggeddon’.    The need for satire In these baffling times, a purposefully distorted notion of … Continue reading In the Face of Trumpaggeddon, We’ve Recruited A Cartoonist

Did Music Fail Us In 2016?

In the age of uber-celebrity, many musicians fail to engage on a meaningful level. We explore why that’s not okay. Art has an emotive power that supersedes online news feeds and newspapers, allowing people to be outspoken in a way others can’t. But while famous visual artists remain engaged with socio-political issues (e.g. Ai WeiWei), the … Continue reading Did Music Fail Us In 2016?

Climate Justice and Human Rights

Climate change is the greatest human rights issue facing humanity today, and that is how we can fight it. The case In 2012 Olivier De Schutter laid bare this argument in The Guardian, observing that climate change represents an enormous threat to a whole host of human rights: the right to food, the right to water … Continue reading Climate Justice and Human Rights

Forming beliefs & the importance of positive thinking [Hilary Jenning’s guest editorial 8]

How we form our beliefs – and why it is important One reason that keeping an open flow of ideas and information is important is in the way we build our beliefs and how these can begin to diverge and lead us to situations of great division. In this podcast, ‘Agree to disagree?’, Kris de … Continue reading Forming beliefs & the importance of positive thinking [Hilary Jenning’s guest editorial 8]

The arts, the law and freedom of speech

Should we let artists speak freely? Julia Farrington weighs up the realities of censorship vs. art unrestrained Police involvement in the cancellation this week of a National Youth Theatre production highlights again the difficult legal challenges for arts organisations putting on contentious work. Can a new set of guidelines help? Reports this week that the … Continue reading The arts, the law and freedom of speech

Richard Mosse: The Enclave

Photographer Richard Mosse sheds new light on civil war in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo in his eye-catching film project, The Enclave Civil war has been happening in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo for many years. Since 1998, the nation has seen 5.4 million war-related deaths. But we seem to hear very little about it. … Continue reading Richard Mosse: The Enclave