Did Music Fail Us In 2016?

In the age of uber-celebrity, many musicians fail to engage on a meaningful level. We explore why that’s not okay. Art has an emotive power that supersedes online news feeds and newspapers, allowing people to be outspoken in a way others can’t. But while famous visual artists remain engaged with socio-political issues (e.g. Ai WeiWei), the … Continue reading Did Music Fail Us In 2016?

Forming beliefs & the importance of positive thinking [Hilary Jenning’s guest editorial 8]

How we form our beliefs – and why it is important One reason that keeping an open flow of ideas and information is important is in the way we build our beliefs and how these can begin to diverge and lead us to situations of great division. In this podcast, ‘Agree to disagree?’, Kris de … Continue reading Forming beliefs & the importance of positive thinking [Hilary Jenning’s guest editorial 8]

Scribble 9: Emergency care and frontline services

In the UK, we are lucky enough not to have to finance our own healthcare. Unlike in the US, where even if you have insurance you can be bankrupted by a cancer diagnosis or serious injury, we currently receive the majority of our healthcare services without having to pay a bill the size of Westminster. … Continue reading Scribble 9: Emergency care and frontline services

Scribble 7: Junior Doctors’ strike

I sometimes work in the emergency department of a large hospital in a phone-answering, stapler-loading, paperwork-herding capacity. If there’s a medical emergency, I know where the hole-punch is, should it be needed. On the picket lines in recent weeks I’ve overheard a variety of comments from members of the public. Here’s a small selection. The … Continue reading Scribble 7: Junior Doctors’ strike

Scribble 6: Privatisation of the NHS

It’s week two! Come on in, sit down, have a biscuit. This week’s posts and poems will focus on voices from the NHS and the idea of access to healthcare as a basic human right. I think it’s fair to say that the NHS is one of our nation’s most precious assets. You can walk … Continue reading Scribble 6: Privatisation of the NHS

Scribble 4: Hate speech

So, in an earlier post I wondered how damaging words can actually be. Today I’ve been listening to some voices whose views teeter precariously between legality and, well, breaking the law. These are views that could be considered as hate speech. The problem with classifying hate speech is that it is often subjective. Some of … Continue reading Scribble 4: Hate speech

Scribble 3: Free speech & dealing with offensive, abusive or difficult speakers

Today’s post is about dealing with offensive and difficult opinions. Warning: some readers may find the following content offensive and/or difficult. Now, I am a hard person to offend. Nevertheless, some people do succeed. Nigel Farage and UKIP’s persistent attempts to demonize anyone from outside of the UK. Roosh V and his neo-masculinist essays on … Continue reading Scribble 3: Free speech & dealing with offensive, abusive or difficult speakers

Freedom Lies: an interview with Ashley Gallant

Discussing the exhibition he recently curated in Lincoln to commemorate Magna Carta, Gallant explains why and where freedom lies today Housed in The Collection perched on Lincoln’s hillside, the three-part contemporary art exhibition Freedom Lies aimed to put the ‘today’ back into Magna Carta commemorations. Creatively displaying a variety of challenging films, the exhibition dealt with hard-hitting rights … Continue reading Freedom Lies: an interview with Ashley Gallant